As Duchamp would say on another occasion, the book was not about him—it was by Schwarz.
— Calvin Tomkins, Duchamp
A director is an Auteur of a movie, but Feige is proving to be the Auteur of a company, and maybe of the entire industry. Art doesn't die in the age of Global Capitalism; it just gets bigger, and stranger.
— Fritz Swanson, "My Response to Martin Scorsese, unpacked for Jason"
So the question is how can we continue sharing but do it in an effective way? We have to think about our target audience (the oppressor) and where they hang out virtually. We have to use their hashtags to meet them virtually.
— @sa.liine
"There is no such thing as a normal period of history," Robinson said. "Normality is a fiction of economic textbooks."
— Zachary D. Carter, The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
Can mine be a birdhouse?
— Lily on her gravestone
But Keynes recognized that money was not only a mechanism for transmitting information about the relative values of different goods; it was also a store of value, which enabled people to make and express judgments about their own material security through time... "The importance of money essentially flows from its being a link between the present and the future."
— Zachary D. Carter, The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
The book is difficult and obscure becasue he wanted it to be. And its sheer ugliness created a small industry of interpreters, some of whom enjoyed distinguished careers and won Nobel Prizes just by simplifying or interpreting sections of the book.
— Zachary D. Carter, The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
"We were just in a position to afford Shakespeare at the moment when he presented himself!" Keynes wrote.
— Zachary D. Carter, The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
This... ...Is Why.
— Caption on image juxtoposition of officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd's neck and Colin Kaepernick kneeling on a football field
It was not the power of Keynes' argument that propelled the book to such wild success. It was the vicious, detailed personal portraits of the Great Men he lambasted.
— Zachary D. Carter, The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes
"People just aren't interesting in the mass," Luce once said. "It's only individuals who are exciting."
— Alan Brinkley, The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century
According to this argument, Duchamp realized that he could never hope to compete on equal terms with his older brothers, much less with Picasso and Braque, and so he coolly and cynically set out to change the rules of the game.
— Calvin Tomkins, Duchamp
When you've proved it can do everything, it reduces your interest when people produce a particular configuration.
— John Conway via Siobhan Roberts, Genius At Play: The Curious Mind of John Horton Conway
Clifford perfected the art of discretion, seeming to want nothing while everything came to him—presidential job offers, big-money clients. That model of power exercised in private by a few of the right men with no need to justify themselves was long gone—one more casualty of Vietnam. Holbrooke was a creature of the post-WASP establishment where power was diffuse and you had to shout for attention to get great things done.
— George Packer, Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century
Getting on in years, Tesla decided to hire a few Western Union boys to feed the pigeons for him. Dressed in their official caps and snappy uniforms, the lads could be seen like clockwork at 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at three different locations around the city: in front of the New York Public Library, in Bryant Park, at the library's rear, and at St. Patrick's Cathedral.
— Marc Seifer, Wizard: the Life and Times of Nikola Tesla
The public seemed to sense, nevertheless, that enormous changes were taking place in man's understanding of the physical world. The phenomena of X rays and radioactivity, the wireless telegraph, electromagnetism, and other recent discoveries had challenged long-held notions about the basic structure of things, and the growing recognition that chance played a significant role in anture's processes undermined the belief that those processes could ever be fully understood. In the nineteenth century science had come to be seen as virtually infallibe; now, quite suddently, the ability of empirical science to explain all things was being called into question, and this was both frightning and liberating.
— Calvin Tomkins, Duchamp
That which is most desirable in the establishment of universal peaceful relations is the complete annihilation of distance.
— Nikola Tesla via Marc Seifer, Wizard: the Life and Times of Nikola Tesla
It's not that people lack the tools to understand art, it's that they lack a reason to give a shit even if they did manage to get inside.
— @bradtroemel, "Repetition Midset: The Unwashed Masses"